Beginner Yoga Monday & Wednesday

Body Edge now offers a Beginner’s Yoga class at 12 noon on Mondays and Wednesdays. For non-members of the gym class is $10 each or 10 classes for $70. Gym members receive a $20 discount.
This class will be for anyone who is curious about yoga, has never tried yoga or for those who just want to deepen an already existing practice. The classes will build upon on each other so it will be good to start now. 
 
The first several classes will be simply learning proper alignment and how it feels to simply move the body and the muscles without even trying, while connecting to one’s breath and quieting one’s mind. We will learn about the calming affects of the breath, stillness, meditation, and yoga philosophy. Over time, and with dedication, we will move in to the yoga postures (asana) and progress to a level of comfort that will allow the student to feel confident in any yoga class or develop a home practice.   – Pam Batchelor
Pam has been teaching yoga for 7 years and has her 200 hr Yoga Teacher Training Certification. She studied in India for 5 weeks. She believe that yoga is for everyone and that it is the one thing that will allow us to flow through life with awareness or our bodies and an element of natural healing that will serve to keep us flexible and free of pain due to not moving or not moving properly.
 
Yoga is not about the pose.
It’s not the alignment of 
toes or hips or shoulders.
It’s not about the form.
Yoga is an invitation to
explore, not a command
performance.  It speaks
the language of the soul.
In the flow of breath and 
motion, yoga coaxes us
from the confines of the
known, across the silent
threshold into vastness.
Yoga is the union of prayer
and movement, guided from
inside.  It is healing and the
joy of saying yes to life.
Breathe, relax and feel the
body receive its own truth.
The seed of freedom flowers
within each of us whenever
we are open to what’s real.
 
Danna Faulds

Free or Discounted Senior Memberships Available

Body Edge offers FOUR options for seniors to join the gym, take classes and pay very little or NOTHING!

All the programs are based on your healthcare insurance.

AARP MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTAL PROGRAM – annual contract is 50% of the Body Edge membership fee ($39/month). $19.50 per month would be drafted from checking, credit or debit account. Go to the website healthyourway.com to get your confirmation code.

SILVER & FIT – $50 per year for eligible NC Blue Cross Blue Shield Advantage or Supplemental members.  May be free for other insurance plans.  Website – silverandfit.com

RENEW ACTIVE – Free to United medicare Advantage members. Website – myrenewactive.com to get confirmation code.

SILVER SNEAKERS – Free to eligible members in participating Medicare Advantage or Supplemental plans. Website – silversneakers.com

 

Programs for 18-64 year olds:

BLUE 365 – Cost dependent on health insurance.  Fee paid to Blue Cross Blue Shield. Website – blue365deals.com

ACTIVE & FIT – Cost dependent on health insurance.  Fee paid to Active & Fit. Website – activeandfit.com

 

Self Defense Class Improves Boy’s School Performance!

Allen Walters has been taking Anthony Merrill’s Total Body Conditioning Self Defense class for four months and loves it.  Recently Allen received the award “Citizen of the Month” for his classroom.  Here is what Allen’s mother had to say…

To Anthony… “I want to thank you because I believe your guidance has had a great influence in his (Allen’s) life! Before you started working with him he was feeling bad about his weight and his self confidence.  Now he has just received Citizen of the Month for his classroom.  Thank you Anthony!

Anthony says, “Allen attends class 4 days per week, is dedicated and hard working.  I am very proud of him and feel like I can help anyone who has the desire to live a healthier lifestyle.”

This is what Allen had to say about coming to class at the gym, “I enjoy taking classes at Body Edge Fitness with Anthony. Everyone is always nice to me. Since starting kickboxing classes I have gained courage and confidence in myself. Also my grades at school have improved because I have become more focused and believe in myself more.”

Youth classes are offered at 4:30pm Monday through Thursday.  Kids may come 1-4 days per week.  Adult classes are offered Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 5:30 and 6:30pm. Cost varies depending on times per week and there is a discount for multiple members of the same family.  Come join the fun, get a great workout and see results!!!

Essential Oil lover…

Lisa JI love using Young Living essential oils. I put a “Wow Water” mix together using Lemon, Lime, Tangerine, Grapefruit, and a touch of Ginger, and I keep it in a glass dropper bottle in my purse. One dropperful in my water bottle and I’m ready for whatever comes!  I use Lavender oil in my linen drawer to give my sheets a light and soothing scent, and I diffuse different combinations of oils all the time — there’s one for every mood. The more you use the oils, the more you learn, the more ways to benefit from them!

Lisa Jennings

Body Edge Fitness has many essential oils in stock for your purchase.  Whether you want to diffuse, apply topically or ingest Young Living Oils are the best around.  We have oils for sore muscles, some to help you sleep, others to increase your energy.  If you need to lose weight… there are oils for that.  Have a cut, thinning hair, or need mosquito repellent… we have you covered.  The list goes on and on.  It’s time to take control of our health and wellness.

Any questions feel free to email me at [email protected] – Cindy Black, owner

7 Tips for Healthy Eating on a Road Trip

road

A familiar summer sight on American highways is a family on a road trip headed for fun and adventure many miles away. These voyages require stops for eating, drinking, and energy release. Fast food joints have established themselves as the go-to solution, with huge signs visible from the distance. Unfortunately, they usually steer you to make unhealthy food choices. Here is some advice to help you make the best of the situation.

1. Prepare in advance by packing healthy snacks:

  • Fresh fruits – apples, bananas, berries of all sorts (pre-washed!)
  • Fresh vegetables – baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, cucumber slices, etc.
  • Canned items – corn, carrots & peas, etc.
  • Homemade trail mix. see this recipe
  • Hard boiled eggs
  • Beef jerky
  • Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches on whole grain bread.

2. Food safety: make sure that chilled foods are stored in a cooler with ice-packs, or that they are consumed before they warm up.

3. Bring plenty of water. You can freeze a bottle or two in advance and then enjoy ice cold water later in the day. Have extra water available for washing hands and utensils.

4. If you’ve run out of food and need to stop to eat, look for supermarkets instead of restaurants. You can buy fresh ingredients to prepare your sandwiches, or simply enjoy fresh fruit. Many supermarkets have a do-it-yourself salad bar and other deli items available. Some even have a seating area. As an added bonus, you will pay less than at a restaurant.

5. If you are traveling on a weekend, try to stop by a farmers market. This website has a comprehensive list of locations across the country.

6. If you do end up at a restaurant, here are a few recommendations:

  • Try to appraise the menu for the healthier options before ordering
  • Give specific instructions to the chef – use less butter, gravy on the side, etc.
  • Have the salad first. Ask for dressing on the side
  • Ask the waiter NOT to bring bread to the table
  • If the portions at the restaurant are very large, ask your waiter to pack half your dish in a doggy bag even before it is served.
  • Drink at least one glass of water before you eat.

7. Find a really good place for ice cream. You can’t bring it from home 🙂

Bottom Line
Prepare in advance and make your road trip pleasurable, memorable, and diet-able!
Thank you Fooducate Pro for this information.fooducate-logo

Bread buying tips…

breadYou can make bread at home with just four ingredients:

  1. flour
  2. water
  3. yeast
  4. salt

With the right equipment and experience, the result is exquisite. But only for a day or two, until the bread goes stale. By day four, it starts to grow mold.

That’s why a majority of people purchase their bread at the supermarket. In order to stay soft and fresh for a week or more, packaged breads need the help of some additives. Some are OK, while others are not. We’ll discuss them in a bit.

Besides the additives, the nutrition grade of a bread depends largely on the type of flour used. Three tips:

  • Make sure the first ingredient is whole grain (100% whole wheat).
  • The bread should be made with 100% whole grains.
  • The fiber count should be 2 or more grams per ounce. sometimes that’s 2 grams per one slice, but not always. Check the serving size.

Bread manufacturers often confuse shopper with tricky terms for the flour used:

  • Enriched flour – This is NOT whole wheat flour. This is refined flour that is enriched because it was stripped of its nutrients when the whole grain was processed into refined flour. Here’s what is added (as mandated by the government) – Vitamin B1 (thiamin), Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (niacin), folic acid, and iron.
  • Multi-grain – Does not mean whole grain. It simply means that several types of grains have been used. For example, wheat and rye instead of just wheat.
  • Organic – indicates how the wheat was grown, not if it was stripped of its nutrients. You can definitely have refined organic wheat.
  • Unbleached / Bleached – indicates if the flour has been subjected to a whitening process or not. Bleached flour goes through more processing and chemicals, so you should prefer non-bleached flour. Whole grain breads are not bleached.
  • Unbromated / unbrominated – In the past, many bakeries used potassium bromate as a dough conditioner to improve the rising of the dough and the texture of the bread. Unfortunately, it is a carcinogen. It is not often used these days, and if it is, should appear on the ingredient list, regardless of its use as an adjective describing the flour.

Now to the additives. Try to avoid bread that uses one of these:

  • Potassium bromate – used as a dough conditioner. (Reminder: dough conditioners (1) shorten dough rising times (2) increase shelf life, and (3) make the dough easier for their machinery to process). Potassium bromate is harmful in its raw form, but disappears during the baking process. Unless some of it doesn’t. Europe, Canada, and many other countries have banned the use of this additive.
  • Azodicarbonamide – another dough conditioner. It also bleaches the flour (makes it whiter). It’s considered safe in the US at up to 45 parts per million, but is banned from use in Europe because studies showed it could cause asthma or allergic reactions.
  • DATEM – an acronym for Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides. Another dough conditioner used to improve volume and uniformity. It is considered safe by the FDA, but a 2002 study on rats showed “heart muscle fibrosis and adrenal overgrowth”.
  • Partially hydrogenated oils – yes, the evil trans-fats lurk in the bread aisle too. Make sure they don’t make the jump to your shopping cart.
  • Mono and di-glycerides, ethoxylated mono and di-glycerides – derived from animal or plant sources, these additives have multiple roles – they are dough conditioners (improve texture, increase volume), emulsifiers, and release agents (make it easier to get the bread out of the baking pan).
  • Calcium propionate – a preservative that inhibits mold and bacterial growth. Considered safe, but in the early 1990’s it was linked to attention deficit disorder in children.
  • High-fructose corn syrup – many breads employ a sweetener to improve taste as well as help the dough rise. (Yeast love sugar – they ferment it to create carbon dioxide which is what makes the bread rise). HFCS is the cheapest sugar, and that is why manufacturers use it.
  • Artificial colors – you’d be surprised, but some breads use artificial colors.
  • sugars / honey / etc…
TEST YOURSELF

For each of the terms below please indicate if it is whole grain or not:

  • organic unbleached unenriched wheat flour
  • ground wheat flour
  • 100% stone ground wheat flour
  • organic heirloom wheat flour
  • unbromated hard red spring wheat flour

Answer: NONE of the above are whole grains flours.

Last tip for today
Here’s another manufacturer trick to look out for. Even if the product package boasts 100% Whole Wheat, you may be getting nutritionally short-changed. You see, manufacturers can add bran and germ to an ingredient list that kicks off with enriched flour. As long as the proportion of endosperm, bran, and germ is equal to what one would find naturally in a whole grain, the package claim “100% Whole Wheat” is technically correct. That’s like buying a car that has been taken apart into a thousand pieces and put back together instead of a new car directly from the dealership. Which would you prefer?
This article was written by:  The Fooducate Team
If you would like help with “cleaning up” your diet, contact Beth Mincher to set up an hour long consult to determine how you can improve your eating to lose weight and/or feel better.  Beth is a Certified Holistic Health Coach, board certified by the American Association of Drugless Practitioners, and received her training through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. She focuses on helping people achieve optimal wellness through a whole body approach; emphasizing the importance of diet, but also other factors such as: physical activity, personal relationships, career, emotional wellness, lifestyle, prevention and the use of natural therapies.
Beth Mincher – (832) 506-9961    or    [email protected]

The Problem With Canned Soup

soup in canSome of us are experiencing a brutal winter with snow and bone-seeping cold that does not seem to be letting up. Soup is a great way to warm up; it can also be a nutritious meal. There is nothing quite like homemade soup, but many people prefer to settle for ready-made. The food industry has known this for decades, hence prepared soups are a billion-dollar industry.

There are several problems with prepared soups. The most obvious is that they simply don’t taste as good as home made. Of course, if you don’t know how to make your own soup, this is a non-issue.

Another problem is the use of lower quality ingredients than you would use at home, for example meat scraps that would never be sold in a supermarket. Additionally, some of the ingredients used would never be found in your home kitchen. Here is an example ingredient list, for Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup:

Chicken Stock, Cooked Enriched Egg Noodles with Added Calcium (Wheat Flour, Calcium Carbonate (In excess of standard), Eggs, Egg Whites, Niacin, Ferrous Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, Cooked Chicken Meat, Contains Less than 2% of: Salt, Cooked Mechanically Separated Chicken, Vegetable Oil, Potato Starch, Chicken Fat, Monosodium Glutamate, Onion Powder, Yeast Extract, Modified Food Starch, Spice Extract, Beta Carotene, Soy Protein Isolate, Sodium Phosphates, Chicken Flavor (Contains Chicken Stock, Chicken Powder, Chicken Fat), Dehydrated Garlic.

Lastly, one of the biggest problems with prepared soups is their extremely high sodium content. America has a long standing love affair with salt, and consumes almost twice as much as the 2300 milligram daily limit. Excessive salt intake contributes to hypertension and heart disease. A single serving of the chicken soup above has 890mg of sodium, 39% of the maximum recommended daily intake Like all liquids, people often consume more than one serving at a time, exacerbating the sodium issue.

Bottom Line

If you love soup, consider preparing your own soup at home. You will know exactly what ingredients go in, and will be able to control just how much salt is added.

Supermarket tips

If you do decide to buy prepared soups, keep in mind the following:

  • The serving size should make sense (one cup). Often manufactures suggest a tiny serving to make it seem like the calories and sodium content are low.
  • Read the ingredient list to make sure you aren’t getting more than you bargained for, for example MSG.
  • Last but not least, choose soup with less than 600mg of sodium per serving, ideally less than 450mg

Here is a healthy and yummy soup to make at home…

Sweet Potato Cauliflower Soup
1 large head cauliflower
Few dashes garam masala (optional)  or try a few dashes of turmeric  (optional)
3 medium to large sized peeled sweet potatoes, cut into 1″ pieces
1 sweet onion, diced
2 cloves garlic
6 cups organic vegetable broth
1 tsp. sea salt  (Use Himalayan pink salt or grey sea salt for best health benefit)
2 handfuls of washed kale (shredded) OR diced Kohlrabi   (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 °F. Wash and cut cauliflower, then sprinkle lightly with garam masala or turmeric.

Place cauliflower onto parchment covered baking sheet and lightly drizzle with olive oil. Roast about 20-30 minutes. In large stockpot, bring sweet potato, onion, garlic, salt and broth to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sweet potatoes are tender. Add in cooked cauliflower and kale (optional).  Simmer about 20 minutes.
This recipe is a great way to boost your antioxidants with winter vegetables and upgrade your nutrition by controlling your ingredients since you’re preparing it at home from scratch!  Plus it’s quick and easy.
Bonus fact:  Did you know that sweet potatoes are high in magnesium which is the anti-stress and relaxation mineral!
Beth - NutritionBeth Mincher, CHHC
Certified Holistic Health Coach @ Body Edge Fitness
Member of AADP, American Association of Drugless Practitioners
Beth Mincher Health Coaching ~ Elemental Wellness

Thieves – Oil of the Month

THIEVES

8 Ways to Improve Your Salad Dressing

salad dressingWritten by: The Fooducate Team

What’s a salad without a dressing?  It’s like Bert without Ernie, a burger without a bun, Sunday without football on TV. A salad is not a salad without some good stuff drizzled on top.

Food manufacturers realized this long ago, and today, entire supermarket aisles are dedicated to salad dressings and toppings. Unfortunately, some dressings do more harm than good. Here are 8 tips to help you make the best choices.

1. Make your own dressing
This is a no-brainer. In most parts of the world, it’s unthinkable to buy salad dressing. People prepare the dressing as part of the salad making process. It’s as easy as mixing 1 part oil, 1 part lemon/vinegar, and adding salt and pepper to taste. From there, you can build your dressing with additional herbs and spices. There’s no shortage of recipes.

If you do find yourself buying salad dressing, read on:

2. Decrease the serving size and calories
The standard serving for salad dressing is 2 tablespoons, ranging from 50 to 200 plus calories. An easy way to cut the calories is to use less dressing. Work the dressing into the salad until you can’t see any blobs of sauce, just a shiny coating all over the salad greens.

3. Don’t water down you salad
Many of the low-fat or non-fat dressings are primarily water. You’re paying over $4.00 for a bottle of dressing, the least they could do is fill it up with a more expensive ingredient like fine olive oil. Also – why drown your greens after you’ve dried them up so nicely before serving?

4. A little bit of fat is not bad
Vitamins A, D, E, and K, found in salad vegetables, are fat soluble. This means your body will be more likely to absorb them when they’re mixed with some oil.

5. Skip the toppings
They may add extra crunch and flavor, but the extra calories and sodium in bacon bits and croutons almost negate the purpose of the salad – a nutrient dense addition to your day.

6. Avoid added sugars
Some dressings can get really tangy, so a bit of added sweetener rounds out the flavor remarkably. The problem is that in many cases, manufacturers add too much sugar. For example, almost 25% of Wishbone’s Red Wine Vinaigrette Salad Dressing calories come from sugar. In other dressings, the sugar content can reach up to 50% of the calories!

7. Salty?
One of the challenges with salad dressing is the sodium content, which can be higher than 500mg per serving. That’s close to 25% of the daily maximum. Look for 300mg per serving, or less.

8. Avoid Phosphoric Acid
Many dressings use phosphoric acid (E338), an artificial additive that provides a tangy taste for a much cheaper price than lemons. Phosphoric acid is widely used in soft drinks. Some studies have linked it’s consumption to lower bone density.

Bottom Line
Salad dressing is a great way to help increase vegetable consumption. Make sure to choose a dressing that does not negate the health benefits of your greens. Better yet, make your own dressing!

Down hill skiing in her 70’s!

Teri & Rumel

Teri & Rumel

The last week of January I visited my family in Burlington, Vermont.  My daughter and I decided the time was right for a day to ski.  We went to Stowe, Vermont.  I prayed as I was on my way down the hill for the first time that I would not fall!  We took three runs that day and went to lunch.  It was a great day for mother and daughter, one that will go to a special place in my heart.

I owe this trip to my Senior Classic class and instructor Teri Daly.  I attend class 2-3 times per week.   I have gotten much stronger and have improved my balance.  Teri is great at her job and truly cares about everyone in our class.  She loves to see our improvements as much as we do!  Thank you Teri.

Rumel Bradt