Pilates starting in June!!!

Joseph Pilates said, “Physical fitness is the first requisite of happiness.” This philosophy shines through with each movement you learn and with each step towards better health you take.

Practiced correctly , Pilates will strengthen your core muscles ( deep abdominal, back and pelvic floor muscles ) and your deep back muscles, helping you achieve relief for your back pain.

Pilates also teaches awareness of neutral alignment of the spine; alignment that is neither perfectly flat nor overly arched; strengthening the deep muscles that support the alignment are important to prevent and alleviate back pain.

The best part of your Pilates experience may be the individualized attention you receive making sure you understand each exercise and each movement for a completely transforming workout. We pride ourselves on providing a safe, comfortable, affordable and friendly workout environment.

If you are looking to transform your body and renew your spirit try our Pilates class with Paula.

June:   Mondays and/or Wednesdays 1:00-2:00pm

July:    Monday 11:45am, Wednesday 1pm

 A note from Paula Micale, your Pilates instructor…

I was born in Bedford, Maine, moved New Jersey at an early age and then to Shallotte, North Carolina in 2011. I am married with two children and two grandchildren.  I became interested in Pilate fitness while an owner/operator of a fitness center in Freehold, NJ. In 2002 I obtained my Personal Pilates Fitness Trainer Certification from the Joseph H. Pilates institute in Waco, Texas, where I learned to teach and understand the techniques of Pilates fitness training.  I introduced Pilates fitness training at my fitness center and taught from 2002 to 2008.  In 2013 after leaving NJ and moving to NC I again became interested in Pilates fitness training. I took a refresher/recertification course in Wilmington, NC.

Since 2013, I have been teaching Pilates at the community center in the Rivers Edge Golf and Plantation where I am a resident.  I have enjoyed teaching Pilates for many years and have seen the benefits in my students as they obtain core strength, flexibility, balance, and general good health.  In my classes the environment is warm and welcoming.  We work hard as a team but share some laughs along the way. I am enthusiastic about helping my students build body awareness and improving their quality of life.  By observing a student’s posture and breathing I can evaluate their progress.  The love of Pilates makes people feel better and move with ease and confidence.

Follow your Breath!!

Paula Micale

Vacationers are Welcome

Yes, it’s that time of year again. The weather gets warm, school gets out and people head to the beach!
Just because you’re on vacation does not mean you can skip your workouts. If you are anything like me, vacation means you eat some of the yummy foods you normally avoid and the adult beverages increase. Yes?

Well here is the good news… Body Edge Fitness offers day passes for $12 or week passes for $30.

Are classes more your speed? (You don’t have to think, the instructor tells you what to do in a fun group environment.) Come try Tabata, Yoga, Strength, Core Challenge, Body Fit, Spin, Edge, Zumba or Silver Sneakers for $10 per class.

Personal Training is also available by appointment to focus on your specific needs for $35 per session.

The staff at Body Edge looks forward to seeing you this summer.
If you and and your family come visit us every summer, I can’t wait to see you walk trough the door again on Monday morning!!!  (psst, I’m the pregnant one)  =)

Safe Travels,
Cindy Black
Owner/Personal Trainer

Awesome New Class

Hey gang, we have added an awesome new class to our schedule…Core Challenge!

This 45 minute class is designed to improve core strength, flexibility, stability and balance using a variety of equipment including your own body weight.

Class will be taught by our very own Teri Daly on Mondays and Wednesdays at 9am during the month of June.

PRO TIP: The Truth About Vitamin Waters

vitamin-waterWalking down the beverage aisle of a supermarket, one is dumbstruck by the sheer number of options available. A growing category, with dazzling colors that scream “buy me”, is vitamin waters.

Vitamin Water XXX is a classic example of unsubstantiated health marketing. Named for its “triple antioxidants” formula of acai, blueberry, and pomegranate flavors, the triple X logo has additional, naughty, connotations: the kind of xxx you can consume in front of your mother, according to the brand’s manufacturer.

With the help of this marketing drivel, the manufacturer, a Coca Cola subsidiary, is making billions of dollars a year. Unfortunately, the nutrition facts panel and the ingredient list is full of deceit.

This is what an honest ingredient list would read:

water, sugar, colors, needless vitamins & minerals.

Here is the ingredient list on the package:

reverse osmosis water, cane sugar, less than 0.5% of: citric acid, magnesium lactate and calcium lactate and potassium phosphate (electrolyte sources), vitamin C (ascorbic acid), fruit and vegetable juice (color), natural flavors, stevia leaf extract, vitamin B5 (calcium pantothenate), beta-carotene, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), manganese citrate, gum acacia.

The ingredients listed are named to get you excited about how chic this product is.

For example, it’s not just any water being provided – you are getting reverse osmosis water, whatever that means. Probably better than regular water, right?

Next up – the sugar. Not just any sugar – it’s cane sugar. Sugar comes from beets or sugar cane. Someone must have decided that cane sugar sounds more sophisticated or healthy. Baloney.

A single serve bottle of this beverage has 8 teaspoons of needless, harmful sugar. Actually, the sugar actually does have a role to play in this beverage – to mask the very bitter taste of the vitamins added. However, 120 calories is a high price to pay when you can get non-bitter water out of the tap for zero calories and zero dollars.

Onwards, down the ingredient list, electrolyte sources also sounds cool. Admit it. However, did you know that a banana is also an electrolyte source?

The vitamins added will likely be mal-absorbed (read: you will urinate them). Their bio-availability is much lower than if consumed as part of whole foods.

Lastly, rest assured that a laboratory has perfected the right combination of natural chemicals to excite your olfactory and taste receptacles. It’s probably not the fruit and vegetable juice, which makes a guest appearance here, with less than 0.5% of the content.

Bottom Line
Marketing hype will not make vitamin waters a healthy hydration choice. Ever.

Supermarket Tip
Get your antioxidants from real fruit, not sugar water. Skip the supermarket beverage aisle and stick with tap water. With the money saved you’ll be able to afford all the tasty, healthy fruits you desire.
Article written by:
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Essential Oil lover…

Lisa JI love using Young Living essential oils. I put a “Wow Water” mix together using Lemon, Lime, Tangerine, Grapefruit, and a touch of Ginger, and I keep it in a glass dropper bottle in my purse. One dropperful in my water bottle and I’m ready for whatever comes!  I use Lavender oil in my linen drawer to give my sheets a light and soothing scent, and I diffuse different combinations of oils all the time — there’s one for every mood. The more you use the oils, the more you learn, the more ways to benefit from them!

Lisa Jennings

Body Edge Fitness has many essential oils in stock for your purchase.  Whether you want to diffuse, apply topically or ingest Young Living Oils are the best around.  We have oils for sore muscles, some to help you sleep, others to increase your energy.  If you need to lose weight… there are oils for that.  Have a cut, thinning hair, or need mosquito repellent… we have you covered.  The list goes on and on.  It’s time to take control of our health and wellness.

Any questions feel free to email me at [email protected] – Cindy Black, owner

7 Tips for Healthy Eating on a Road Trip

road

A familiar summer sight on American highways is a family on a road trip headed for fun and adventure many miles away. These voyages require stops for eating, drinking, and energy release. Fast food joints have established themselves as the go-to solution, with huge signs visible from the distance. Unfortunately, they usually steer you to make unhealthy food choices. Here is some advice to help you make the best of the situation.

1. Prepare in advance by packing healthy snacks:

  • Fresh fruits – apples, bananas, berries of all sorts (pre-washed!)
  • Fresh vegetables – baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, cucumber slices, etc.
  • Canned items – corn, carrots & peas, etc.
  • Homemade trail mix. see this recipe
  • Hard boiled eggs
  • Beef jerky
  • Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches on whole grain bread.

2. Food safety: make sure that chilled foods are stored in a cooler with ice-packs, or that they are consumed before they warm up.

3. Bring plenty of water. You can freeze a bottle or two in advance and then enjoy ice cold water later in the day. Have extra water available for washing hands and utensils.

4. If you’ve run out of food and need to stop to eat, look for supermarkets instead of restaurants. You can buy fresh ingredients to prepare your sandwiches, or simply enjoy fresh fruit. Many supermarkets have a do-it-yourself salad bar and other deli items available. Some even have a seating area. As an added bonus, you will pay less than at a restaurant.

5. If you are traveling on a weekend, try to stop by a farmers market. This website has a comprehensive list of locations across the country.

6. If you do end up at a restaurant, here are a few recommendations:

  • Try to appraise the menu for the healthier options before ordering
  • Give specific instructions to the chef – use less butter, gravy on the side, etc.
  • Have the salad first. Ask for dressing on the side
  • Ask the waiter NOT to bring bread to the table
  • If the portions at the restaurant are very large, ask your waiter to pack half your dish in a doggy bag even before it is served.
  • Drink at least one glass of water before you eat.

7. Find a really good place for ice cream. You can’t bring it from home 🙂

Bottom Line
Prepare in advance and make your road trip pleasurable, memorable, and diet-able!
Thank you Fooducate Pro for this information.fooducate-logo

How to Enjoy Ice Cream Without Guilt

ice cream 2Raise you hand if you don’t love ice cream. It’s one of the highlights of summer (and all year long, for some of us). Unfortunately, it’s a treat comes with a lot of nutritional baggage. As its name implies, ice cream is made with cream, which is loaded with fats and saturated fats. It’s rich in calories and sugars, and that’s what makes it so tasty. This doesn’t necessarily mean you should abstain. Here are some tips to help you make the right choices this summer.

The first and most important piece of advice is to mind your portion size. Unfortunately, no matter what frozen treat you eat, the serving size always seems too small…

The standard serving size for ice cream is just half a cup. That’s about the size of your fist. If your ice cream has 200 calories per serving and you are tempted to eat a full cup, you will be doubling your calories to 400!

As an addendum to the above, never ever eat ice cream directly from the package it came in. It’s a surefire way to over-consume.

When ordering at an ice cream stand, you’ll almost always be served a large portion. Try to stick with one scoop, or ask for the kid-size option.

Enjoy your ice cream in a bowl or cup, not a cone or other edible instrument. You’ll save 50 to 100 calories.

One way to consume less calories is to opt for low fat or non-fat ice creams. Some taste better than others, but if you do go down this road, read the ingredient list to see what ingredients have replaced the fat. In some cases, they are worse than a full fat ice cream.

If you’re planning on frozen yogurt, you should know that it may not be any lower in calories compared to regular ice cream. Although yogurt sounds healthier than ice cream, it may not have any live and active cultures – which are the main health benefits of yogurt. Read the label to make sure.

Fruit based sorbets or bars are a lower calorie choice. They barely have any saturated fat and taste great. They tend to be very high in sugar, though. Don’t get thrown by “made with real fruit”. Read the ingredient list to make sure that fruit is the first ingredient.

Ice pops are low in calories because they are mostly water, sugar, and colors. Read the ingredient list to avoid products with artificial colors, which may cause hyperactivity in some children.

Bottom Line
Treat yourself to ice cream and other frozen delights in small portions!

Supermarket tips
Read the ingredient lists to make sure your frozen treat does not include unwanted artificial fillers, colorings, or additives.
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Bread buying tips…

breadYou can make bread at home with just four ingredients:

  1. flour
  2. water
  3. yeast
  4. salt

With the right equipment and experience, the result is exquisite. But only for a day or two, until the bread goes stale. By day four, it starts to grow mold.

That’s why a majority of people purchase their bread at the supermarket. In order to stay soft and fresh for a week or more, packaged breads need the help of some additives. Some are OK, while others are not. We’ll discuss them in a bit.

Besides the additives, the nutrition grade of a bread depends largely on the type of flour used. Three tips:

  • Make sure the first ingredient is whole grain (100% whole wheat).
  • The bread should be made with 100% whole grains.
  • The fiber count should be 2 or more grams per ounce. sometimes that’s 2 grams per one slice, but not always. Check the serving size.

Bread manufacturers often confuse shopper with tricky terms for the flour used:

  • Enriched flour – This is NOT whole wheat flour. This is refined flour that is enriched because it was stripped of its nutrients when the whole grain was processed into refined flour. Here’s what is added (as mandated by the government) – Vitamin B1 (thiamin), Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (niacin), folic acid, and iron.
  • Multi-grain – Does not mean whole grain. It simply means that several types of grains have been used. For example, wheat and rye instead of just wheat.
  • Organic – indicates how the wheat was grown, not if it was stripped of its nutrients. You can definitely have refined organic wheat.
  • Unbleached / Bleached – indicates if the flour has been subjected to a whitening process or not. Bleached flour goes through more processing and chemicals, so you should prefer non-bleached flour. Whole grain breads are not bleached.
  • Unbromated / unbrominated – In the past, many bakeries used potassium bromate as a dough conditioner to improve the rising of the dough and the texture of the bread. Unfortunately, it is a carcinogen. It is not often used these days, and if it is, should appear on the ingredient list, regardless of its use as an adjective describing the flour.

Now to the additives. Try to avoid bread that uses one of these:

  • Potassium bromate – used as a dough conditioner. (Reminder: dough conditioners (1) shorten dough rising times (2) increase shelf life, and (3) make the dough easier for their machinery to process). Potassium bromate is harmful in its raw form, but disappears during the baking process. Unless some of it doesn’t. Europe, Canada, and many other countries have banned the use of this additive.
  • Azodicarbonamide – another dough conditioner. It also bleaches the flour (makes it whiter). It’s considered safe in the US at up to 45 parts per million, but is banned from use in Europe because studies showed it could cause asthma or allergic reactions.
  • DATEM – an acronym for Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides. Another dough conditioner used to improve volume and uniformity. It is considered safe by the FDA, but a 2002 study on rats showed “heart muscle fibrosis and adrenal overgrowth”.
  • Partially hydrogenated oils – yes, the evil trans-fats lurk in the bread aisle too. Make sure they don’t make the jump to your shopping cart.
  • Mono and di-glycerides, ethoxylated mono and di-glycerides – derived from animal or plant sources, these additives have multiple roles – they are dough conditioners (improve texture, increase volume), emulsifiers, and release agents (make it easier to get the bread out of the baking pan).
  • Calcium propionate – a preservative that inhibits mold and bacterial growth. Considered safe, but in the early 1990’s it was linked to attention deficit disorder in children.
  • High-fructose corn syrup – many breads employ a sweetener to improve taste as well as help the dough rise. (Yeast love sugar – they ferment it to create carbon dioxide which is what makes the bread rise). HFCS is the cheapest sugar, and that is why manufacturers use it.
  • Artificial colors – you’d be surprised, but some breads use artificial colors.
  • sugars / honey / etc…
TEST YOURSELF

For each of the terms below please indicate if it is whole grain or not:

  • organic unbleached unenriched wheat flour
  • ground wheat flour
  • 100% stone ground wheat flour
  • organic heirloom wheat flour
  • unbromated hard red spring wheat flour

Answer: NONE of the above are whole grains flours.

Last tip for today
Here’s another manufacturer trick to look out for. Even if the product package boasts 100% Whole Wheat, you may be getting nutritionally short-changed. You see, manufacturers can add bran and germ to an ingredient list that kicks off with enriched flour. As long as the proportion of endosperm, bran, and germ is equal to what one would find naturally in a whole grain, the package claim “100% Whole Wheat” is technically correct. That’s like buying a car that has been taken apart into a thousand pieces and put back together instead of a new car directly from the dealership. Which would you prefer?
This article was written by:  The Fooducate Team
If you would like help with “cleaning up” your diet, contact Beth Mincher to set up an hour long consult to determine how you can improve your eating to lose weight and/or feel better.  Beth is a Certified Holistic Health Coach, board certified by the American Association of Drugless Practitioners, and received her training through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. She focuses on helping people achieve optimal wellness through a whole body approach; emphasizing the importance of diet, but also other factors such as: physical activity, personal relationships, career, emotional wellness, lifestyle, prevention and the use of natural therapies.
Beth Mincher – (832) 506-9961    or    [email protected]

Pleased Member…

DianeBody Edge is a people friendly gym that has all the equipment anyone could need.  They offer multiple classes and are always adding new and exciting things to keep you interested.  (The Jacob’s Ladder challenge is definitely interesting!)  They are also Silver Sneakers and Silver & Fit certified which is important to me.   With Silver Sneakers I am able to use the facility for FREE.  I especially like that the gym opens at 6:00 am and is open all day, unlike some places that close for several hours in the middle of the day and then re-open in the evening.  I have been with Cindy for about 8 years and have seen her expand to a larger building and then expand that space with two much needed additions as her business has grown.  I would not work out anywhere else!  Cindy and her fitness center are the best!

Diane Kreuzburg

The Problem With Canned Soup

soup in canSome of us are experiencing a brutal winter with snow and bone-seeping cold that does not seem to be letting up. Soup is a great way to warm up; it can also be a nutritious meal. There is nothing quite like homemade soup, but many people prefer to settle for ready-made. The food industry has known this for decades, hence prepared soups are a billion-dollar industry.

There are several problems with prepared soups. The most obvious is that they simply don’t taste as good as home made. Of course, if you don’t know how to make your own soup, this is a non-issue.

Another problem is the use of lower quality ingredients than you would use at home, for example meat scraps that would never be sold in a supermarket. Additionally, some of the ingredients used would never be found in your home kitchen. Here is an example ingredient list, for Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup:

Chicken Stock, Cooked Enriched Egg Noodles with Added Calcium (Wheat Flour, Calcium Carbonate (In excess of standard), Eggs, Egg Whites, Niacin, Ferrous Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, Cooked Chicken Meat, Contains Less than 2% of: Salt, Cooked Mechanically Separated Chicken, Vegetable Oil, Potato Starch, Chicken Fat, Monosodium Glutamate, Onion Powder, Yeast Extract, Modified Food Starch, Spice Extract, Beta Carotene, Soy Protein Isolate, Sodium Phosphates, Chicken Flavor (Contains Chicken Stock, Chicken Powder, Chicken Fat), Dehydrated Garlic.

Lastly, one of the biggest problems with prepared soups is their extremely high sodium content. America has a long standing love affair with salt, and consumes almost twice as much as the 2300 milligram daily limit. Excessive salt intake contributes to hypertension and heart disease. A single serving of the chicken soup above has 890mg of sodium, 39% of the maximum recommended daily intake Like all liquids, people often consume more than one serving at a time, exacerbating the sodium issue.

Bottom Line

If you love soup, consider preparing your own soup at home. You will know exactly what ingredients go in, and will be able to control just how much salt is added.

Supermarket tips

If you do decide to buy prepared soups, keep in mind the following:

  • The serving size should make sense (one cup). Often manufactures suggest a tiny serving to make it seem like the calories and sodium content are low.
  • Read the ingredient list to make sure you aren’t getting more than you bargained for, for example MSG.
  • Last but not least, choose soup with less than 600mg of sodium per serving, ideally less than 450mg

Here is a healthy and yummy soup to make at home…

Sweet Potato Cauliflower Soup
1 large head cauliflower
Few dashes garam masala (optional)  or try a few dashes of turmeric  (optional)
3 medium to large sized peeled sweet potatoes, cut into 1″ pieces
1 sweet onion, diced
2 cloves garlic
6 cups organic vegetable broth
1 tsp. sea salt  (Use Himalayan pink salt or grey sea salt for best health benefit)
2 handfuls of washed kale (shredded) OR diced Kohlrabi   (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 °F. Wash and cut cauliflower, then sprinkle lightly with garam masala or turmeric.

Place cauliflower onto parchment covered baking sheet and lightly drizzle with olive oil. Roast about 20-30 minutes. In large stockpot, bring sweet potato, onion, garlic, salt and broth to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sweet potatoes are tender. Add in cooked cauliflower and kale (optional).  Simmer about 20 minutes.
This recipe is a great way to boost your antioxidants with winter vegetables and upgrade your nutrition by controlling your ingredients since you’re preparing it at home from scratch!  Plus it’s quick and easy.
Bonus fact:  Did you know that sweet potatoes are high in magnesium which is the anti-stress and relaxation mineral!
Beth - NutritionBeth Mincher, CHHC
Certified Holistic Health Coach @ Body Edge Fitness
Member of AADP, American Association of Drugless Practitioners
Beth Mincher Health Coaching ~ Elemental Wellness